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First year at university is hard.

I must admit, I was naïve when I first attended university. I listened to my high school teachers preach that year 12 was the hardest year of your life and that everything would get easier after that. I (not wanting to brag) got through year twelve with not as much stress as I expected and ended up with a higher score than I thought I could achieve. Do not get me wrong I worked hard, but I was in a good routine of studying before school, working hard during school hours and then studying after school (for a couple of hours each night). I did not work during year twelve and therefore was still able to enjoy some “me time” on the weekends. When being accepted into the Psychology (honours) degree, I was told that I would need to maintain a GPA of 5.5 (out of 7- for those unfamiliar with the Australian University grading system) in psychology related subjects to keep my spot in honours. I did not think this was going to be a challenge- as I said I got through year 12 “the hardest academic year of my life” fine… I remember getting my first grade at university back, for an elective subject and receiving a HD.  My teachers were right- the next four years will be a breeze, I thought. In the very next class, on the same day I received my second grade. A P1! […]

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How to answer: “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

The question “what do you want to be when you grow up” sends shivers down the spine of all senior high school students, as well as many, many adults! It is an important question and to answer it I think there are four things you need to do. 1) Really, really research your prospective career paths. This is particularly important if the jobs you are considering require courses (tafe, university etc.) which cost a lot of money and consume a lot of time. The type of questions you need to answer include; is there multiple job opportunities where you live (if you are not willing to travel), what do you actually have to do to get a job (for example to be a clinical psychologist in Australia you must complete a three year undergraduate degree, one honours year, two years of a masters degree + two years supervision- that is eight years of hard work and competition that many people are not aware of!), are there particular aspects of the job that will clash with your personality (for example academia research can be extremely critical, and if you are a person does not handle criticism well, that is something you would need to consider) and also what type of lifestyle does the job entail?… which leads me to my second point. 2) It is important to consider the type of lifestyle that you want. What I mean by this is your career has […]

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